How to Reduce Truck Driver Neck and Back Pain

Posted on November 21, 2018

Truck Driving on Highway

 

 

 

 

 

 

Most people associate work-related back pain with jobs that require a lot of bending or heavy lifting. However, prolonged sitting can also be the source of back pain, something which many truck drivers know all too well. Truck drivers are often seated for hours on end, in a position that readily puts strain on back muscles and ligaments. If the issue remains unaddressed, this pain can spread into their necks and even their legs.

Preventing Back Pain

The best method of dealing with drivers’ back pain is to prevent it altogether. There are several methods to help keep drivers’ backs in better condition, to help mitigate the onset of back and neck pain:

  1. Exercise whenever possible. When drivers reach a rest stop or stop driving for the day, they should work out and stretch to reinvigorate muscles after a long period of disuse. Stretching is particularly important to help relieve tense muscles after sitting in one position for several hours.
  2. Invest in seat support. Truck drivers have many expenses and often try to keep costs down by limiting luxury purchases for their cab. However, ergonomic seat cushions are well worth the price tag. They provide support and correct drivers’ posture to prevent the pain associated with slouching into the seat.
  3. Focus on posture. While it’s not feasible to think about good posture every second of a long drive, there are some things drivers can do to prevent back pain, by changing some basic driving behavior. For example, many drivers carry their phones or wallets in their back pocket. Removing these before sitting down can improve posture and reduce muscle strain. And changing seat position, moving the height or angle of the seat, each and every hour, can reduce both muscle fatigue and mental fatigue.

Managing Back Pain

Once drivers strain their muscles, they should rapidly take steps to manage the pain before it becomes an injury. Some tips include:

  1. Ice the area. Applying an ice pack to sore muscles for around 20 minutes can help numb the pain, reduce the damage, and decrease swelling.
  2. Alternate cold with heat therapy. So long as the area is no longer numb and the swelling is gone, drivers can also use heat as a means to manage back pain. Heat can relieve pain and spasms as well as help warm up muscles before stretching.
  3. Take breaks. Pushing through pain is rarely worth it. Drivers who ignore their back pain in favor of reaching their destination faster risk increasing the pain and causing lasting damage.

When drivers take steps to prevent and manage back pain, they reduce the likelihood of an injury. Left unchecked, drivers could experience lasting health complications that keep them out of work. To learn more ways to reduce and manage trucking risk, contact the experts at Interstate Motor Carriers.

What is the TRALA 8 Day Rental Exemption?

Posted on November 07, 2018

Truck Drivers - Truck Insurance

 

 

 

 

 

 

There is some confusion among motor carriers regarding commercial vehicle rentals. The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) exempts short-term rentals from needing to use Electronic Logging Devices (ELDs) due to the duration of usage. Drivers who fall under this exemption may continue to use paper records of duty status (RODS) in lieu of an ELD; however, there are some limitations.

Updates to the TRALA Exemption

Some motor carriers are under the impression that the exemption applies to rentals for up to 30 days. This is incorrect. In March of this year, the 30-day exemption for short-term rentals expired. While the Truck Rental And Leasing Association (TRALA) petitioned FMSCA to extend the 30-day exemption through the end of 2018, FMCSA denied the request and an 8-day exemption went into effect.

Terms and Conditions of the Exemption

FMCSA provides some basic guidelines for commercial motor vehicle (CMV) rentals.

  • The exemption applies to CMV rentals for eight days or less. Attempts to release the same CMV after eight days is a violation of the exemption.
  • Rental drivers need a copy of the exemption letter while operating the CMV.
  • Drivers must carry a copy of their rental agreement clearly stating who is renting the vehicle and the dates of the rental.
  • Drivers must keep copies of their RODS for the current day and any preceding days during the applicable eight-day period.
  • All other FMCSA regulations apply during the rental.

Another provision of the rental exemption is the carrier renting the CMVs must report any accident to FMCSA within five business days. When notifying FMCSA of the incident, motor carriers need to provide the following information:

  • Provide the exemption explanation (TRALA)
  • Date of the accident
  • Location of the accident
  • Name and license number of the driver and co-driver
  • Number and state license number for the vehicle
  • Number of people injured
  • Number of fatalities
  • The cause of the accident as reported by the police
  • Any citations issued to the driver
  • Total time the driver spent operating the vehicle as well as their on-duty time leading up to the accident

Carriers need to submit this information via email to MCPSD@dot.gov. Failing to comply with the above provisions can lead to FMCSA revoking exemption privileges. To learn more about this exemption, other safety provisions, and truck insurance solutions, contact the experts at Interstate Motor Carriers.

5 Simple Steps for Better CSA Scores

Posted on October 22, 2018

CSA Scores  -Truck Insurance

 

 

 

 

 

Truck drivers and fleets are aware of the importance of CSA scores. While FMCSA can’t suspend a CDL license due to CSA scores, they can target drivers for interventions and levy heavy fines against them. This is why it’s critical for both owner-operators and company drivers to keep their CSA scores low. Drivers can follow these 5 steps to improve their CSA scores.

  1. Harness the power of electronic logging devices (ELDs). One of the most common violations roadside inspectors see are “form and manner” violations. These types of violations include outdated logs, hence the usefulness of an ELD. While FMCSA regulations required all motor carriers to upgrade their vehicles to include an ELD in December of 2017, some can continue to use an automatic on-board recording device (AOBRD) through 2019. While the technology has a temporary grandfather clause, it’s worth the peace of mind to make the change to an ELD.
  2. Focus on the brakes. With Brake Safety Week in the recent past, many carriers are feeling the sting of brake violations. Given the importance of braking for truck safety, it’s surprising how often drivers overlook them during pre-trip inspections. While checking brakes is harder and messier than other aspects of pre-trip inspections, brake violations add up quickly.
  3. Perform thorough pre-trip inspections. Brakes aren’t the only element that drivers need to inspect before hitting the road. In addition to problems with brakes, the most common violations relate to lights and tires. A broken light alone carries a 6-point penalty. Problems with tires carry an 8-point penalty. Several light and tire violations can rack up CSA points and hurt a carrier’s safety rating in one roadside inspection alone. Performing a complete pre-trip inspection can help drivers and carriers avoid these hefty penalties.
  4. Challenge violations. Fleets and drivers aren’t without recourse following a violation. They have two years to challenge the violation, which can result in a smaller penalty or a dismissal of the charge. Even if the charge isn’t dismissed, reducing the severity means reducing the point value assigned to it. It’s always worth the effort to challenge violations.
  5. Drive healthy. Failing to produce a valid medical certificate carries a relatively small fine of one point. However, driving while ill is one of the most serious violations and carries a 10-point penalty. Fleet managers need to make sure drivers have valid and up to date medical cards certifying their health and fitness to drive as well as monitor any health concerns.

Implementing regular training on driver safety can go a long way toward avoiding these violations. Companies that put a focus on driver safety can implement proactive measures to improve safety and reduce risk. Contact Interstate Motor Carriers to learn more about managing your fleet’s safety and risk needs.

Uber Freight Technology for Owner Operators

Posted on October 10, 2018

Truck Insurance

 

 

 

 

 

Uber launched its innovative trucking app “Uber Freight” a little over a year ago with the intention of revolutionizing how truck drivers perform their jobs. The app works much like standard Uber services. However, instead of pairing a rider with a driver, the app pairs a truck driver looking for a job with nearby freight. Truck drivers can plan these jobs weeks in advance or the day of if they so desire.

Why is Uber Freight Good for Owner Operators?

One of the key differences for truck drivers booking a load with Uber Freight versus on their own is that they don’t have to negotiate the fare with shippers. Uber Freight predetermines and guarantees prices before the shipment begins. Once the driver delivers the freight, the app starts the reimbursement process and guarantees payment within seven days.

How Does Uber Freight Calculate Prices?

Uber Freight takes a number of factors into consideration when developing a delivery price. These include:

  • Distance. This is one of the biggest elements in determining a price for a delivery.
  • Cargo type. Some cargo is more valuable or sensitive and thus nets a higher rate.
  • Location. Certain areas generate higher prices much like any other service.
  • Surge pricing. Uber Freight understands supply and demand and adjusts prices to reflect the marketplace.

How Does the App Work?

Traditional Uber services don’t give the rider many options when it comes to their driver. However, Uber Freight offers Owner Operators many options to secure the best load for their rig. Drivers can swipe through a variety of available jobs rather than the app pairing them with one like Uber does for traditional riders. The app also recognizes the need for fine-tuning and allows drivers to sort by date, time, and location.

Uber Freight Perks Program

Uber Freight developed a reward program called Uber Freight Plus for drivers that frequent app users. The app offers different discounts based upon frequency such as:

  • Uber Freight Plus fuel card. So long as drivers book one load per month, the app saves them 20 cents per gallon at TA/Petro truck stops and 15 cents per gallon in participating Roady’s gas stations in California, Texas, and Illinois. These individuals can also save up to 30% on Goodyear tires.
  • Savings on truck purchases. Once an individual hits 10 loads per month, they can save up to $16,000 at Navistar on new trucks or earn a $4000 rebate for used trucks from participating brands. Navistar also offers 20-50% off the cost of parts and vehicle maintenance.
  • Other perks and benefits. There are several bonuses for drivers who use the Uber Freight Plus app such as discounts on phone plans with Sprint.

The app also learns driver preferences over time much like Pandora creates unique stations for its users. The app pays attention to the driver’s preferences, such as where they prefer to travel, and makes recommendations on available jobs. Drivers can also list their availability to help companies match with them.

Uber Freight can be a major benefit to independent operators and small fleets. Harnessing the power of innovative trucking technology can help truck drivers decrease the amount of time they spend looking for jobs and improve their overall bottom line. To learn more about enhancing and protecting your trucking operation, contact the experts at Interstate Motor Carriers.

How to Prepare Your Trucks for a Hurricane

Posted on September 17, 2018

Truck Drivers - Fleets - Hurricane Preparation

 

 

 

 

 

As Hurricane Florence continues its trek across the east coast, truck drivers are reminded now more than ever that hurricane season is still in full force. Although this summer has been relatively quiet concerning hurricanes, Florence made up for the calm with Category 4 winds and torrential rainfall. Weather events of this magnitude require that truck drivers need to take extra precautions to ensure their personal safety, and the safety of their trucks and cargo.

7 Steps to Prepare Truck Drivers For Sever Weather Events

Weather events like Hurricane Florence will have long-lasting effects on truckers, from closed roads, to flooded terminals, the impact of these events can dramatically impact drivers and fleets. The following steps can help truck drivers manage changes in their routine and stay safe during the storm:

  1. Cancel or reroute all deliveries that cross through the path of the storm.
  2. Allow for extra time to reach locations, and plan multiple alternate routes.
  3. Pay close attention to National Weather Service announcements (every two hours as the storm approaches). Many locals may believe the storm won’t be as significant the news portrays. Inaction can result in tragedy. Heed all local weather advisories and evacuation notices.
  4. Move all vehicles that won’t be used to higher ground in areas affected by the storm. The location should be free of trees, power lines, or any other objects that could impact the vehicle.
  5. Fill all vehicle fuel tanks prior to the storm, as power may be interrupted in many locations and cause delays in fuel deliveries. This can lead to closed fuel stations, long lines and increased prices at the pump in areas affected by the path of the storm.
  6. Perform a thorough pre-trip inspection to ensure tires, windshield wipers, and all lights are operational. Drivers do not want to be caught in bad weather when they discover a problem with their vehicle they could’ve addressed before they started driving.
  7. As always, slow down, increase driving distance, brake slowly, and make sure headlights are on during inclement weather.

Important Changes to HOS Rules for Hurricane Florence

Truck drivers in the most affected areas trying to evacuate don’t need to worry about violating hours of service (HOS) regulations. Both the Governor of North Carolina and South Carolina issued executive orders waiving HOS rules as well as Size & Weight requirements for truck drivers as they prepare for Hurricane Florence. The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) also issued a Regional Emergency Declaration for Delaware, D.C., Florida, Georgia, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Virginia, and West Virginia exempting drivers from Parts 390-399 of Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (FMCSRs). Restrictions do apply, so drivers should be sure to familiarize themselves with the Emergency Declaration.

A truck driver’s number one priority during a hurricane should be his or her safety. To learn more ways to reduce your risks, contact the experts at Interstate Motor Carriers.

 

5 Healthy Fast Food Choices for OTR Truck Drivers

Posted on September 05, 2018

Truck Driver Health - NJ Truck Insurance

 

 

 

 

 

 

Finding healthy entrees at fast food restaurants doesn’t need to be difficult. As consumers have become more health-conscious, restaurants have added lighter fare options to their menu. These selections are often under 600 calories and carry less fat content than the traditional burger and fries. Today, a healthy trucker lifestyle doesn’t have to go by the wayside just because the driver pulled into a fast food parking lot.

Some general rules for healthier eating include:

  • Limit fried foods to once a week
  • Minimize sugar intake (and stay away from prepackaged foods and sweets)
  • Eat the vegetables you like, and consume large portions

In regards to veggies, many people feel like they have to keep up with trends. If kale isn’t your thing, don’t sweat it. All vegetables are good for you, so pick what you like.

How to Eat Healthy at Fast Food Restaurants

Many people think that fast food means high calorie meals. But many of the major chains offer some good options for truckers. The following are some of the healthiest options available at typical fast food locations:

  1. Chipotle. This chain offers a variety of healthy options—so long as truck drivers skip the tortilla. Chipotle offers taco salads that allow customers to load up on greens, veggies, chicken or steak.
  2. Panera Bread. This chain that offers a variety of healthy options so long as truck drivers resist temptation like the large mac and cheese which weighs in at 1,100 calories. The turkey avocado BLT is healthy and filling while the Greek salad with chicken is a guilt-free yet tasty choice.
  3. Burger King. The above two fast food options make it simple to stick to healthy choices. Traditional burger chains like Burger King pose more of a challenge. Truck drivers can keep the pounds at bay by opting for a chicken garden salad and keeping their dressing use to a minimum.
  4. Wendy’s. Wendy’s grilled chicken sandwich is a great alternative to a grease-laden burger. Consider swapping out their fries for some chili to increase your protein intake.
  5. Kentucky Fried Chicken. While fried is in its name, KFC does offer some healthier, grilled options. Their grilled chicken sandwich paired with some green beans are a great choice for truck drivers on the road.

Keeping truck drivers healthy is vital for both owner operators and managers of large fleets. Truck drivers need to learn and select the healthiest options available to them while they are out on the road. To learn more creative ways for truckers to stay safe and healthy, contact Interstate Motor Carriers.

Telematics for Owner Operators & Small Fleets

Posted on August 27, 2018

Telematics for Owner Operators & Small Fleets

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Many owner operators and small fleets discount telematics, as large fleets are often construed as the primary buyers. However, this doesn’t mean smaller operations can’t benefit from telematics. The data provides valuable feedback for drivers and fleets, regardless of size. Telematics solutions can track acceleration, driver speed, fuel economy, idling time and braking metrics. Telematics can provide exact location data for all vehicles and trailers, extremely beneficial in the event of a stolen truck or lost trailer. Many small fleets write off telematics because they are often considered large scale applications and come with an equally large price tag. However, there are many cost effective solutions today, and even basic smartphone apps, that drivers and managers can use to obtain Telematics data. While a smartphone app alone would be cumbersome for larger fleets, a manager of a small fleet can track the data for a few trucks from the palm of their hand.

More robust Telematics solutions, from organizations like Lynx Telematics and DriverCheck offer some highly advanced features, though many of these organizations also offer an owner operator version of this technology. Here is sampling of features available from the DriverCheck Telematics solution:

• Driver Behavior-harsh brake/fast acceleration/speeding
• Posted speed limit analysis
• Maintenance alerts and reports
• GIS map integration
• 3rd party vendor software integration
• Driver ID
• Panic Button
• PTO/Accentuator Monitoring
• Unlimited user(s) access from any internet connected device
• Idle and start stop driving reports
• Client customization reports
• Email/text message event based alert notification

Though pricing and features vary widely, costs for Telematics can range from under $14 per month for one truck, to over $40 per month per vehicle.

Owner operators and smaller fleets need to embrace newer technologies to stay competitive. As functionality increases and costs decrease, even the smallest trucking firms can improve operations and profitability by utilizing these cloud based solutions. To learn more about mitigating your trucking risk, contact the experts at Interstate Motor Carriers.

The Future Is Now For Trucking

Posted on August 07, 2018

New Jersey Truck Insurance

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Many within the transportation industry scoffed at the notion of autonomous vehicles, and they weren’t alone. The idea of self-driving vehicles seemed like science fiction at best and dangerous at worst, yet the technology is here and already in use. Budweiser shipped over 50,000 cans of beer in a self-driving truck, and Uber, Waymo, Tesla and Embark are all running live pilots with autonomous trucks. While the technology isn’t 100% ready for the public at large, it’s rapidly becoming a reality. High tech tools and futuristic technology are dominating recent transportation publication headlines with solutions like these, which are all available today:

Telematics and GPS Fleet Tracking Systems

Simply said, telematics encompasses the software and devices that power the electronic features found in all vehicles including trucks. GPS is one of the key applications in telematics, and includes:

  • Navigation, fuel monitoring and route planning
  • Driver behavior applications including braking, fast acceleration and speeding
  • Complex route planning and arrival/departure alerts
  • Automated tracking and analytics productivity reports
  • Trailer tracking and historical routing
  • Idle and start/stop driving reports

ELDs and Trucking Software Applications

ELDs provide the wireless tools and technology to ensure that truckers and fleets maintain compliance with the FMCSA ELD mandate.

Self-driving Trucks and Platooning

As mentioned previously, self-driving truck testing is well underway. Platooning is also being tested by manufacturers including Daimler. Platooning extends self-driving technology by wirelessly tethering trucks together, allowing them to operate in a tighter highway formation (convoy) than would be possible with human drivers at the wheel.

Electric Vehicles

Tesla is the big name when it comes to electric vehicles, and Tesla Semi, the automaker’s electric truck division has been accumulating many reservations over the last few months. Tesla is expected to produce all electric trucks in 2019. But they aren’t alone, as many major manufacturers are actively working on completely electric trucks. Volvo has announced two new fully-electric trucks designed to take the place of urban delivery and refuse collection vehicles. Both will be available in the European market in 2019.

What to Expect in the Coming Years

As if the list above insufficiently represents the dramatic changes happening in the trucking industry, there are some seemingly imminent and impressive technologies expected to impact truckers and fleets in the near future. These include:

Augmented Reality

Heads up displays (HUDs) are nothing new for vehicles, but augmented reality is about to take them to the next level. BMW is working on a HUD that can superimpose real-life objects from the road onto a truck’s HUD to allow drivers to navigate obstacles with greater ease.

Software Repairs

Trucks require ongoing maintenance and recalibration to perform at their optimum level. However, new technology will allow software to make these calibrations without ever pulling into a repair shop.

Trucking companies need to prepare for these dramatic changes, and Interstate Motor Carriers can help. Contact us to learn how we can help protect you today and in the future.

Will Military Drivers Help Solve the Driver Shortage?

Posted on July 23, 2018

military truck - Truck driver shortage - trucking insurance

 

 

 

 

 

 

With the commercial driver shortage already affecting the industry, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) has been making big changes to try to stabilize the situation. Part of their plan includes a pilot program allowing 18 to 21-year-olds with prior relevant military experience to operate commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) in interstate commerce. The program is also targeting civilians 18-20 with licenses to operate CMVs in intrastate commerce and 21 to 24-year-olds already licensed for interstate commerce. This final demographic will serve as the control group to compare stats and scores for safety and general operations.

What Are the Program Requirements?

Around 50 carriers will participate in the pilot program of 600 drivers—200 for each designated group of drivers. FMCSA estimates they will need an additional 20 carriers and 300 drivers to account for turnover rates. In addition, the US DOT agency is giving preference to carriers that can provide an even number of drivers for each group. FMCSA is also taking significant measures to ensure the safety of all participating drivers as well as the motoring public.

The qualification requirements include:

  • Carrier contact info and demographic stats
  • Retain drivers’ background info form and consent form
  • Responsible for training drivers on the FMCSRs and maintaining compliance
  • Cannot be a moderate or high-risk carrier
  • Cannot have conditional or unsatisfactory safety ratings
  • Cannot have any open or closed enforcement actions in the preceding six years.
  • Cannot be above the national average for vehicle and driver out-of-service (OOS) rates or crash rates

Additional provisions apply once participating in the program. These include:

  • Provide monthly data reports on driver activity, safety results, and other supporting details
  • Inform FMCSA within five days if a driver leaves a participating carrier
  • Inform FMCSA within one day of any injury or fatality, alcohol incident, or if a driver leaves the program altogether

Much like the carriers, participating drivers also have requirements. FMCSA disqualifies drivers if they:

  • Had more than one license
  • Had a canceled, disqualified, revoked, or suspended license
  • Had a traffic violation other than a parking ticket per military, state, or local laws
  • Had a conviction for any of a variety of motor vehicle violations (i.e. DUI, BAL greater than or equal to 0.4 while operating a CMV, fled the scene of a crash, reckless driving, etc.).

Understanding the Driver Shortage

By the end of 2016, the driver shortage stood at 36,500. The American Trucking Association (ATA) thinks that number will exceed 175,000 by 2024 due to a variety of factors including demographics, regulations, lack of work-life balance, and an aging workforce. This final element, driver retirement, will account for almost half of the demand for new drivers. The economy is already feeling the effects of the shortage, as the cost for deliveries increased and delivery times lengthened. The driver shortage problem isn’t just a matter of filling a labor gap. Retention is a significant element of ensuring the survival and success of a fleet.

To learn more about improving your trucking business and coverages, contact the experts at Interstate Motor Carriers. We will help implement innovative solutions to meet your retention and risk management needs.

 

Summer Driving Safety

Posted on June 28, 2018

School is out for the summer! The long winter has finally ended and kids & teens across the country are free from school days. For the trucking industry summer means the opposite of freedom, for this is the busy season. There are many variables to be concerned with whilst driving in the summer, especially as a trucker. Below we have listed some of the most important tips and precautions to prepare for this season:

  • Be Properly Equipped – Summer driving means heat, sun glare, and longer days. Be sure to pack a hat, sun glasses, extra water, and plenty of snacks. Did we mention you should pack water? Hydration is key to staying focused and healthy during the summer months!
  • Be Aware of the Extra Drivers – With summer in full swing, teenagers and college drivers will be on the roads more than any other season. In addition to students, families will be hitting the road for vacation making road congestion a big concern. Make sure you are aware of your surroundings by always checking your mirrors and properly signaling before changing lanes.
  • Construction is Being Done – Be wary of road work! The summer is when most construction is typically going to be done, especially on roads. Be conscious of all signs as you drive, and respond accordingly. Slow down and be prepared to stop when driving through construction zones.

Of course, these are only a few conditions that drivers must be aware of while driving in the summer. We urge you to stay safe, healthy and cautious this summer (and every season)!