Showing posts from tagged with: FMCSA

Webinar: How to Survive an FMCSA Compliance Review

Posted on December 06, 2016

Join Interstate Motor Carriers for this educational webinar to learn how to survive FMCSA compliance reviews. Expert speaker Rob Dowling, Transportation Safety & Loss Control Director at The Capacity Group, will review the key components of the compliance review, the procedures you’ll need in order to achieve a satisfactory rating, and the consequences of failing to do so. Topics include:

* What is a Compliance Review (CR)shutterstock_3129935 - Copy
* Compliance Review Process
* When Do I Begin The Process
* Six Factor Review Process
* Continuous process to Remain Compliant

Date & Time: Wed, Dec 14, 2016 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM EST

Registration URL: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3269874292259164674

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ELD Mandate – Implementation Timeline, Compliance, and More

Posted on August 09, 2016

shutterstock_42770536 - CopyThe Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration’s Electronic Logging Device (ELD) Mandate began to go into effect on February 16 of this year. But we’re still in phase 1 of the three-phase implementation process. Currently compliance is voluntary, as the FMCSA encourages motor carriers to prepare for their upcoming compliance requirements. Phase 2 begins on December 18, 2017. In this phase, carriers will be permitted to use only AOBRDs (Automatic On-Board Recording Devices) installed prior to this date, or ELDs certified and registered after the inception of phase 1.

In the third and final phase beginning December 16, 2019, all applicable carriers must enlist certified and registered ELDs in their transportation efforts. Currently ELD manufacturers certify their own devices for compliance with federal guidelines. Increasingly widespread use of ELDs is intended to help protect drivers from excessive road-time, reduce the likelihood of falsified logs, and standardize data across the industry. The mandate applies to most commercial vehicles with a GVWR over 10,000 pounds.

There have been legal challenges filed by some businesses and organizations – perhaps most notably the Owner-Operator Independent Drivers Association (OOIDA), which has claimed that the FMCSA has failed in proving the cost-benefit ratio of the new regulations are beneficial to the industry. This transitional period in the industry is likely to provoke a number of challenges, both legal and logistical, but many carriers have already initiated compliance efforts with the forthcoming regulatory phases. To learn more about the ELD mandate and how your organization can comply and benefit, contact us.

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Transportation Regulatory Updates: MAP-21, FAST Act, CSA Data, and GHG Emissions

Posted on March 16, 2016

Several potentially significant transportation regulatory items have recently surfaced in the news causing much discussion and preparation for motor carriers across the country. These include:

  • CSA raw data once again available to publictraffic of bridge
  • Highway safety improvement reporting requirement for states removed
  • High risk rural roads provision removed
  • Greenhouse gas regulatory documents released
  • EPA & NHTSA legal policy memo & engine test results

CSA raw data was originally legislated to exist in the public eye, but was pulled from view almost immediately after being signed into law. FMCSA claims that their analytics represent a fair, accurate, and important picture of safety culture and records throughout the transportation industry.

The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) has released revisions to its Highway Safety Improvement Program, which could have numerous effects on transportation professionals across the country. These revisions stem from MAP-21 and the FAST Act, and include a removal of reporting requirements as well as the high risk rural roads provision. This reduced transparency could alter the efficacy of the program.

Private meetings with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) have resulted in the release of a variety of documents by federal regulators regarding greenhouse gas emissions. These include memos on the legality of the greenhouse gas policy, selective enforcement and inspection of aerodynamic compliance among transportation power units, effects of tire rolling resistance on stopping distance for Class 8 vehicles, and more.

Is your transportation business prepared for these and other regulatory changes? Do you know the potential cost savings or increase associated with each policy change? To learn more about the impact these and other regulatory changes could have on your business, contact us.

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Webinar: ELD Final Rule Published – Overview & Impact

Posted on February 22, 2016

Interstate Motor Carriers and Sentry Insurance invite you to a complimentary, educational web seminar to learn how the new ELD Final Rule will impact your transportation business. Subject matter expert speaker Daniel Grant, Director of Safety Services at Sentry Insurance, will provide an overview of the ELD mandate, including compliance requirements and implementation timelines. Mr. Grant will also detail how the final rule integrates driver harassment/coercion guidelines. Featured topics:

* Truck InsuranceImpact of ELD Mandate & Adoption Timelines
* Device Specifications & Hardware Requirements
* Roadside Inspections & Supporting Documentation
* Exceptions to New Final Rule
* Implementation Challenges
* Driver Harassment Rule

Date & Time: Thu, Mar 10, 2016 1:00 PM – 1:45 PM EST

Registration URL: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2927157611217343745

Click here to learn more about Interstate Motor Carriers & Sentry Insurance.

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Know Your Hours of Service Regulations

Posted on February 11, 2016

slide1Safety is a primary concern for any commercial driver. The Hours of Service regulations exist to promote and enforce uniform safety practices. Understanding and complying with these rules helps to ensure safe vehicle operation while avoiding fines and penalties. So let’s review the latest round of regulatory changes.

11-Hour Limit:

An interstate property-carrying driver is allowed to drive their truck up to 11 hours. All their time spent behind the wheel of the CMV in operation is considered “driving time.” After 11 hours of driving time, the driver must have at least 10 consecutive hours “off duty” before they can drive again. In order for time to be considered off duty, the driver must be relieved of all duty and responsibility for performing work. Also, the driver must be able to leave the place where their vehicle is parked.

14-Hour Limit:

The 14-hour rule is known as the 14 hour “driving window” limit. A driver is allowed a period of 14 consecutive hours in which they may drive up to 11 hours of those 14 hours on duty. Under the 14-hour rule, a driver may not drive beyond the 14th consecutive hour after coming on duty, following 10 consecutive hours off duty.

The 14-hour window begins the moment the driver starts any kind of work. “On duty” time includes all the time a driver is working or is required to be ready to work. Examples include time spent at a terminal or facility of a motor carrier or shipper, time inspecting and servicing the truck, time loading and unloading and all driving time. Once the driver reaches the end of the 14th hour on duty period, they cannot drive again until they have been off for 10 hours.

The window is limited to 14 consecutive hours, even if you have some off-duty time such as a 30-minute lunch break or nap during those 14 hours. Your 30-minute break will not extend this 14-hour period, rather the 30-minute meal break will count against the 14-hour driving window. An exception to this rule would be with drivers in the 100 air-mile radius of their work reporting location who are not required to take the minimum 30-minute breaks.

Rest Breaks:

A driver may only drive if 8 hours or less has passed since end of driver’s last off duty or sleeper berth period of at least 30 minutes. Meal breaks or other off duty time of at least 30 minutes qualifies as a break. Within the 14-hour window and 11-hour driving rule, a driver may drive a total of 11 hours during their 14-hour driving period; but, driving will not be permitted if more than 8 hours have passed since the end of the driver’s last 30-minute break. Of note, the FMCSA has exceptions to the required rest break, such as the short-haul exceptions in 395.1(e). Further, if a driver is working but not driving after 8 hours, no break is required.

To learn more, contact the transportation experts at Interstate.

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FMCSA Lowers Random Drug Testing Standard to 25%

Posted on January 04, 2016

shutterstock_69873625 - CopyAs of the first of this month, motor carriers will only have to test half of the previous portion of employees for use of illegal substances. The FMCSA reduced the threshold from 50% to 25% in an effort to reduce financial burden on the transportation industry while maintaining the same level of safety standards. Studies have indicated that a 25% random drug screening rate is sufficiently high to discourage use of illegal substances, making any testing beyond this threshold likely superfluous.

This comes as a result of three consecutive years with an industry-wide positive rate of less than one percent, indicating a high degree of compliance among transportation professionals. Though subject to further change, it is expected that these levels of random testing will continue for the foreseeable future. To learn more about these and other transportation issues, contact us.

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DOT Delays Safety Fitness & Speed Limiter Rules

Posted on April 20, 2015

The Department of Transportation (DOT) and the Federal Motor Carrier Administration (FMCSA) delayed two important rules in the April Rulemaking Report. The Carrier Safety Fitness Determination and Heavy Vehicle Speed Limiters rules will both have a significant impact on trucking companies, but details will not be finalized until later this year.

Carrier Fitness Safety Determination – The safety fitness rule is now scheduled to be published on August 17, 2015. This rule will revise safety fitness methods used to determine when a driver is fit to operate a vehicle. Determinations will be based on Behavioral Analysis and Safety Improvement Categories (BASICs) and/or an investigation.

Heavy Vehicle Speed Limiters – This rule is being reviewed by both the FMCSA and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and is now schedule to be released on July 27, 2015. This rule would require the installation of speed limiting devices on all trucks over 26,000 pounds.

The DOT April Rulemaking Report is available here: http://www.dot.gov/regulations/report-on-significant-rulemakings

For more information about how these rules could impact your organization, contact the trucking experts at Interstate Motor Carriers.

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FMCSA to Increase Fines for Regulatory Violations Effective June 2

Posted on April 06, 2015

On Friday April 3rd, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration published inflation adjustments to civil penalties for regulatory violations. This final rule takes effect June 2, 2015 and increases numerous penalties. Examples include a $1,000 increase in the penalty for out of service orders and a $5,000 increase in penalties for loading and unloading violations.

In a Federal Register posting, FMCSA explains that many fines and penalties have not been updated since 2003 or 2007, and certain changes were mandated by MAP-21. FMCSA also indicated that this series of changes was not significant enough to warrant a full regulatory evaluation or public comment.

The Final Rule can be viewed on the Federal Register website here.

A table summarizing the various increases can be found on the Federal Register website here.

For a simplified version of the table, visit CCJ or FleetOwner.

Contact Interstate Motor Carriers for additional information on how these changes will impact your business.

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FMCSA Announces How New 34-Hour Restart Study Will be Conducted

Posted on March 23, 2015

On Thursday March 19th, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration announced how the new 34-hour restart study will be conducted. The goal of this study is to compare driver safety and fatigue levels of the following two groups:

  1. Commercial drivers who take at least two nighttime rest periods during the 34-hour restart break
  2. Commercial drivers who take one nighttime rest period during the restart break

The study will be conducted over a five month period and will measure numerous factors related to driver safety. This include accidents, near accidents, fatigue, alertness and more. Drivers will be selected to participate from motor carrier fleets of all sizes and from a wide variety of operations.

Metrics will be monitored and evaluated using several devices and tests: Electronic Logging Devices to measure time on duty, actigraph watches to measure sleep, psychomotor vigilance tests to monitor alertness, and onboard cameras.

After the five month data collection is completed, a review board will assess the data and advise the Department of Transportation of their findings.

Here is a link to the March 19, 2015 FMCSA announcement: http://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/safety/research-and-analysis/commercial-motor-vehicle-driver-restart-study

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Timeline for 5 New Rules & Regulations Coming in 2015 for Commercial Driver Licenses (CDL)

Posted on November 18, 2014

Driving a Commercial Motor Vehicle requires a higher level of knowledge, experience, skills, and physical abilities than what is required to drive a non-commercial vehicle. Hence, CDL drivers are held to a higher standard when operating any type of motor vehicle on public roads. The Commercial Driver’s License Information System (CDLIS) is a nationwide computer system that enables state driver licensing agencies (SDLAs) to ensure that each commercial driver has only one driver’s license and one complete driver record. State driver licensing agencies use CDLIS to complete various procedures. This coming year the following regulations will take effect:

  1. Jan 3, 2015 – States must begin enforcing the cell phone prohibition/restriction final rule. For more info: Mobile_Phone_Rule_Fact_Sheet.pdf 
  2. Jan 30, 2015 – States must begin enforcing the regulation that paper copies of the Medical Examiner’s Certificate are only valid for the first 15 days after their issuance. As of this date, State driver licensing agencies will be adding medical self-certification status and the information on medical examiner’s certificate to the Commercial Driver’s License Information System (CDLIS) record. All commercial drivers engaging in interstate commerce with a maximum gross vehicle weight rating of over 10,000 pounds (4,536 kilograms) are required to obtain and maintain a valid Medical Examiner’s Certificate (ME Certificate).Commercial drivers who drive vehicles requiring a CDL have two additional requirements. On or before January 30, 2015, all CDL holders must declare to their State Driver Licensing Agency (SDLA) that they only operate or expect to operate commercially in 1 of 4 possible categories with their CDL. This process is called self-certification.

    For more information, view the following: http://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/registration/commercial-drivers-license/medical or http://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/registration/commercial-drivers-license/state-state-instructions-submitting-medical-certificates-0

     

  3. July 8, 2015 – States must start enforcing all provisions of the CDL Testing and CLP (Commercial Lines Permit) Standards final rule. For more information: http://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/registration/commercial-drivers-license/states 
  4. July 8, 2015 – States must implement Commercial Driver’s License Information System (CDLIS) 5.3 into production no later than this date.
  5. Sept 30, 2015 – States must be in compliance with all CDL requirements (MAP-21, Section 32305). The MAP-21 stipulations are aimed at state agencies’ notifications and record-keeping of testing, licensing, violations, convictions and disqualifications. The DOT is requiring all states to submit a report prior to Nov. 13, 2014 addressing actions they plan to take to address any deficiencies in their commercial driver’s license program, as identified by the DOT in the most recent audit of the program. http://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/registration/commercial-drivers-license
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