Showing posts from tagged with: Owner Operators

4 Major Changes Proposed for HOS Regulations

Posted on May 22, 2019

Truck Driving - Truck Insurance

 

 

 

 

 

 

Truck drivers and carriers have complained that many of the existing hours of service (HOS) regulations are too restrictive if not outright impossible to adhere to while maintaining customer expectations for deliveries. However, it is not these complaints that sparked the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration’s interest in revising the rulings. Instead, the DOT is pulling data from the much-contested electronic logging devices (ELDs) to guide their proposed changes.

How ELDs are Affecting HOS Regulations

ELDs are tamper-proof, unlike their paper records predecessor. The devices wrought an almost instantaneous decrease in HOS violations, resulting in less weary and therefore safer drivers. However, the data also revealed some truths about the transportation industry to FMCSA. Primarily that times and technology have changed customer expectations, and how people do business.

FMCSA’s Advanced Notice of Proposed Rulemaking

FMCSA is seeking commentary on proposed changes in an effort to reduce excessive burdens on truck drivers to remain compliant but without compromising safety on the roads. The proposed revisions include:

  1. Lengthening the short-haul 100 air-mile exemption from 12 to 14 hours on-duty. This would make the exemption consistent with existing regulations for long-haul commercial drivers.
  2. Permit a temporary two-hour increase for the 14-hour on-duty limitation when drivers encounter unfavorable driving conditions.
  3. Reinstating the option to allow truck drivers to split the mandatory 10-hour off-duty rest time so long as the driver’s truck has a sleeper-berth.
  4. Amending the existing ruling requiring a 30-minute break after eight hours of unbroken driving.

FMCSA’s primary concern is always to keep roads safe for drivers and the motoring public. However, they understand the difficulties truck drivers encounter while operating their vehicles. After reviewing the data from ELDs, the DOT agency is proposing changes to keep pace with modern challenges, expectations, and business requirements without increasing risk.

Since releasing their advanced notice of proposed rulemaking (ANPR), FMCSA received over 5000 comments. Most of the comments focused on known pain-points for truck drivers, underscoring just how challenging existing HOS regulations are for drivers.

Interstate Motor Carriers is intimately familiar with the challenges both fleets and independent operators encounter when trying to remain compliant with HOS regulations while running a successful business. Contact us today to learn more about our innovative solutions designed to help reduce your transportation risk without adding undue stress to drivers.

5 Interesting Facts About Truck Following Distances

Posted on May 08, 2019

Owner Operator Truck Driver Safety

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Every owner operator knows tailgating is a bad idea and can increase the risk of accidents, injuries, and fatalities. However, many truck drivers fail to allow themselves the appropriate following distance based on their vehicle, road conditions and weather conditions. Check out the five following facts about safe following distances that truck drivers should familiarize themselves with to improve trucking safety.

  1. Avoiding tailgating isn’t the same thing as a safe driving distance. The general rule of thumb is that for every 10 mph the commercial vehicle travels, the driver needs to add their truck’s length in following distance. For example, truck drivers traveling 50 mph will need to leave five of their trucks’ lengths between them and the vehicle in front of them. However, factors such as the tire quality, breaks and terrain can affect this ratio.
  2. Outside factors affect safe driving distance. As mentioned above, other elements influence safe stopping distance. Truck driver speed, the weather, vehicle condition, construction, traffic and road obstacles all influence how much space drivers need for a safe stop. Adverse weather, aging equipment, and increased congestion all warrant a greater following distance.
  3. Hill speed can cause accidental tailgating. Some drivers try to max their speed while going downhill to reduce the speed loss they’ll experience going uphill. However, this can lead to surprises when the driver discovers a passenger vehicle much closer than anticipated when they crest a hill. This excess speed can force drivers into an unwanted tailgating situation.
  4. It’s harder to maintain a safe following distance than many drivers realize. It’s fairly easy to sustain safe following distances on open roads. However, in metropolitan areas or well-traveled highways, things get trickier. Drivers should pick a lane and stick with it to allow passenger vehicles to maneuver around the commercial vehicle. Yet this is often insufficient in many busy areas, requiring truck drivers to maintain slower than normal speeds to create the necessary distance for maximum safety.
  5. Insufficient following distance can lead to jackknifing. Sudden braking can lead to a jackknife scenario where the weight of the trailer adversely impacts the tractor. Jackknifing is one of the most dangerous situations for truck drivers.

Owner operators must maintain constant vigilance to ensure safe following distances. Passenger vehicles are often unaware how much space trucks need to operate safely on the road. Allowing these drivers to pass without impacting following distance is a challenge that truck drivers need to overcome to ensure the safety of themselves and their vehicles. Learn more about reducing risk and improving owner operator truck safety, contact the experts at Interstate Motor Carriers.

E-Commerce Offers Opportunities for Owner-Operators and Regional Fleets

Posted on March 13, 2019

Truck Drivers - Truck Insurance









The e-commerce boom has dramatically impacted the trucking industry. Gone are the days where drivers could wait several days, or even a week to fill their trucks before hitting the road. As e-commerce industry giants continue to increase customer expectations, trucking businesses need to find ways to make fast deliveries without increasing shipping costs.

Managing Shipping Expectations

One of the greatest challenges created by the e-commerce boom is balancing shipping expenses with consumer expectations. With 55% of customers preferring same-day delivery and 44% expecting next-day delivery, truck drivers are going to be hard-pressed to keep up without increasing shipping charges.

Consumers don’t want to pay extra shipping fees, and in many cases expect free shipping. With more companies offering free shipping on minimum orders, the solution to the added expense will likely fall on the retailer rather than the consumer. As a result, packaging is expected to undergo significant changes. Smaller, lighter, leaner packages are likely to replace less streamlined options currently in place.

Challenges for Fleets

As more brick and mortar stores close, as the result of more efficient online competition, truck drivers are in higher demand than ever. Compounding this issue is the ever-growing truck driver shortage. While this is a challenge for fleets that make their living with long hauls, it spells opportunity for local and regional operators. It is often more efficient for independent operators, and smaller regional fleets to make the short-haul and last mile deliveries than it is for large fleets. Amazon Logistics offers an example of the new opportunities available to owner operators and trucking entrepreneurs. Their website offers an “opportunity to build and grow a successful package delivery business,” with low startup costs, technology assistance, and an existing customer base. Today, savvy owner-operators can identify a wider variety of local and regional shipments that don’t require travel outside of their state boundaries.

Shifting industry dynamics also results in a changing risk landscape. Fleets that make long hauls have different concerns than owner-operators that work within a 250-mile radius. Whether your transportation business comprises a fleet of vehicles or is an independent operation, Interstate Motor Carriers can help. Contact us to learn more about our innovative solutions to reduce transportation risk.

Truckers Should Eat This but Not That: A Guide to Healthy Eating for Truck Drivers

Posted on December 27, 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Maintaining a healthy diet and fitness routine is difficult for anyone, but truck drivers have a few additional challenges. However, overlooking poor food choices will catch up quickly in pounds, health problems, and even issues at work.

Eating healthy while on the road is a challenge every trucker needs to overcome. Adhering to the following tips can help simplify this issue:

  1. Eat less food at more frequent intervals. Eating big, heavy meals may feel satisfying for the moment, but it can cause problems for drivers later. Large meals weigh drivers down and make them drowsy, increasing safety risk. Eating more meals throughout the day with smaller portions can improve drivers’ metabolisms and help keep them alert.
  2. Ditch the sugary drinks. Many people think their food choices are causing their weight gain, but beverages can pack on the pounds as well. Sugary sodas, sweet tea, energy drinks, and even coffee can all rack up calories throughout the day. Truck drivers should try to make water their primary hydration source. If the lack of taste is an issue, drivers can try squeezing in a bit of lemon to add some flavor.
  3. Bring healthy snacks on the road. Packing ahead of time can help truck drivers avoid making poor food choices due to hunger. If drivers keep hummus, peanut butter, and a mix of fruits and vegetables with them, they can satisfy hunger cravings with healthy options instead of greasy, fried ones. Keeping a stock of nonperishable snacks such as granola bars, nuts, and trail mix can help as well.
  4. Plan routes with food in mind. While drivers have set routes, they can plan where they intend to stop to eat. If drivers wait until the last minute to look for food options, they may find themselves surrounded by fast food and not much else. However, if they take the time to identify delis or grocery stores on their route, they can find a healthy meal option.

Finding a routine that works best for maintaining a healthy lifestyle may involve a bit of trial and error for truck drivers. However, even if fast food is their only option, some restaurant chains offer healthy menu items. Check out our list of healthy fast food choices to learn more about staying safe and healthy while on the road. Contact Interstate Motor Carriers to learn more.

 

8 Great Exercises Truckers Can Do Without a Gym

Posted on December 18, 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

Truck drivers spend so much time on the road that it can be difficult to find an opportunity to go to the gym. While some gyms are open 24 hours, there is a limited number available and they may not be convenient on any given route. Many truck drivers don’t want to pay for a gym membership when they can’t use it regularly. This results in truck drivers neglecting their health and fitness.

However, truck drivers can perform many exercises without equipment or a gym. Research shows that regular exercise improves truck drivers’ physical health and mental health. To keep their minds and bodies in top condition, truck drivers can perform the following eight exercises almost anywhere and at any time:

  1. Dips. Dips are great to tone triceps, delts, and pecs. Trucker drivers can use a chair, tire, bumper, step or even perform this exercise directly on the ground.
  2. Lunges. This foundational bodyweight strength exercise is great for developing leg muscles. The lunge is suitable for beginners and can be used with additional weight to increase intensity. If truckers keep a set of dumbbells in their rig, they can get even more out of their lunge routine.
  3. Planks. This core exercise also works drivers’ arms, backs, and legs as well. It’s a great exercise to target a lot of muscles on the body. Much like push-ups, so long as drivers have room to extend their legs and brace their hands shoulder width apart, they can perform this exercise.
  4. Push-ups. Individuals can scale this exercise to meet their fitness level. So long as there is room for drivers to extend their legs back and space their hands shoulder width apart, they can perform the standard form of this exercise. Drivers just getting started on their physical fitness journey can perform push-ups from their knees or by leaning against a wall. Drivers can pass the time waiting on a load by doing a few sets of push-ups.
  5. Sit-ups/crunches. Drivers can perform these exercises straight from their sleeper. This makes it an ideal exercise to start the day. Waking up ten minutes earlier than usual to knock out a few sets of sit-ups can improve drivers’ abdominal strength and overall health. Drivers can even incorporate abdominal squeezes while they’re stopped at red lights or for the duration of certain songs on the radio.
  6. Squats. The squat is a lower body strengthening exercise that truckers can perform almost anywhere. It’s a highly functional exercise movement working major muscles of the hips and legs. To execute a superman, simultaneously raise your arms, legs, and chest off of the floor, then hold this contraction for 2 seconds. Drivers should remember to exhale during this movement.
  7. Superman. It may take truckers a while before they feel like superman, but they will definitely get in better shape if they add the superman exercise to their workout. The superman is a bodyweight movement that targets the posterior core and lower back muscles.
  8. Walking. Don’t underestimate the benefit of walking. Many truck stops include walking trails for this exact reason. However, in lieu of walking trails, truck drivers should try to increase the number of steps they take in any given day by parking in the farthest spot from their destination, and using stairs instead of elevators whenever possible.

Keeping truck drivers healthy has long-reaching effects. Healthy truck drivers are less prone to illness, which allows fleets to operate at optimum levels. Contact the experts at Interstate Motor Carriers to learn how we can help your trucking company.

 

5 Simple Steps for Better CSA Scores

Posted on October 22, 2018

CSA Scores  -Truck Insurance

 

 

 

 

 

Truck drivers and fleets are aware of the importance of CSA scores. While FMCSA can’t suspend a CDL license due to CSA scores, they can target drivers for interventions and levy heavy fines against them. This is why it’s critical for both owner-operators and company drivers to keep their CSA scores low. Drivers can follow these 5 steps to improve their CSA scores.

  1. Harness the power of electronic logging devices (ELDs). One of the most common violations roadside inspectors see are “form and manner” violations. These types of violations include outdated logs, hence the usefulness of an ELD. While FMCSA regulations required all motor carriers to upgrade their vehicles to include an ELD in December of 2017, some can continue to use an automatic on-board recording device (AOBRD) through 2019. While the technology has a temporary grandfather clause, it’s worth the peace of mind to make the change to an ELD.
  2. Focus on the brakes. With Brake Safety Week in the recent past, many carriers are feeling the sting of brake violations. Given the importance of braking for truck safety, it’s surprising how often drivers overlook them during pre-trip inspections. While checking brakes is harder and messier than other aspects of pre-trip inspections, brake violations add up quickly.
  3. Perform thorough pre-trip inspections. Brakes aren’t the only element that drivers need to inspect before hitting the road. In addition to problems with brakes, the most common violations relate to lights and tires. A broken light alone carries a 6-point penalty. Problems with tires carry an 8-point penalty. Several light and tire violations can rack up CSA points and hurt a carrier’s safety rating in one roadside inspection alone. Performing a complete pre-trip inspection can help drivers and carriers avoid these hefty penalties.
  4. Challenge violations. Fleets and drivers aren’t without recourse following a violation. They have two years to challenge the violation, which can result in a smaller penalty or a dismissal of the charge. Even if the charge isn’t dismissed, reducing the severity means reducing the point value assigned to it. It’s always worth the effort to challenge violations.
  5. Drive healthy. Failing to produce a valid medical certificate carries a relatively small fine of one point. However, driving while ill is one of the most serious violations and carries a 10-point penalty. Fleet managers need to make sure drivers have valid and up to date medical cards certifying their health and fitness to drive as well as monitor any health concerns.

Implementing regular training on driver safety can go a long way toward avoiding these violations. Companies that put a focus on driver safety can implement proactive measures to improve safety and reduce risk. Contact Interstate Motor Carriers to learn more about managing your fleet’s safety and risk needs.

Uber Freight Technology for Owner Operators

Posted on October 10, 2018

Truck Insurance

 

 

 

 

 

Uber launched its innovative trucking app “Uber Freight” a little over a year ago with the intention of revolutionizing how truck drivers perform their jobs. The app works much like standard Uber services. However, instead of pairing a rider with a driver, the app pairs a truck driver looking for a job with nearby freight. Truck drivers can plan these jobs weeks in advance or the day of if they so desire.

Why is Uber Freight Good for Owner Operators?

One of the key differences for truck drivers booking a load with Uber Freight versus on their own is that they don’t have to negotiate the fare with shippers. Uber Freight predetermines and guarantees prices before the shipment begins. Once the driver delivers the freight, the app starts the reimbursement process and guarantees payment within seven days.

How Does Uber Freight Calculate Prices?

Uber Freight takes a number of factors into consideration when developing a delivery price. These include:

  • Distance. This is one of the biggest elements in determining a price for a delivery.
  • Cargo type. Some cargo is more valuable or sensitive and thus nets a higher rate.
  • Location. Certain areas generate higher prices much like any other service.
  • Surge pricing. Uber Freight understands supply and demand and adjusts prices to reflect the marketplace.

How Does the App Work?

Traditional Uber services don’t give the rider many options when it comes to their driver. However, Uber Freight offers Owner Operators many options to secure the best load for their rig. Drivers can swipe through a variety of available jobs rather than the app pairing them with one like Uber does for traditional riders. The app also recognizes the need for fine-tuning and allows drivers to sort by date, time, and location.

Uber Freight Perks Program

Uber Freight developed a reward program called Uber Freight Plus for drivers that frequent app users. The app offers different discounts based upon frequency such as:

  • Uber Freight Plus fuel card. So long as drivers book one load per month, the app saves them 20 cents per gallon at TA/Petro truck stops and 15 cents per gallon in participating Roady’s gas stations in California, Texas, and Illinois. These individuals can also save up to 30% on Goodyear tires.
  • Savings on truck purchases. Once an individual hits 10 loads per month, they can save up to $16,000 at Navistar on new trucks or earn a $4000 rebate for used trucks from participating brands. Navistar also offers 20-50% off the cost of parts and vehicle maintenance.
  • Other perks and benefits. There are several bonuses for drivers who use the Uber Freight Plus app such as discounts on phone plans with Sprint.

The app also learns driver preferences over time much like Pandora creates unique stations for its users. The app pays attention to the driver’s preferences, such as where they prefer to travel, and makes recommendations on available jobs. Drivers can also list their availability to help companies match with them.

Uber Freight can be a major benefit to independent operators and small fleets. Harnessing the power of innovative trucking technology can help truck drivers decrease the amount of time they spend looking for jobs and improve their overall bottom line. To learn more about enhancing and protecting your trucking operation, contact the experts at Interstate Motor Carriers.

5 Healthy Fast Food Choices for OTR Truck Drivers

Posted on September 05, 2018

Truck Driver Health - NJ Truck Insurance

 

 

 

 

 

 

Finding healthy entrees at fast food restaurants doesn’t need to be difficult. As consumers have become more health-conscious, restaurants have added lighter fare options to their menu. These selections are often under 600 calories and carry less fat content than the traditional burger and fries. Today, a healthy trucker lifestyle doesn’t have to go by the wayside just because the driver pulled into a fast food parking lot.

Some general rules for healthier eating include:

  • Limit fried foods to once a week
  • Minimize sugar intake (and stay away from prepackaged foods and sweets)
  • Eat the vegetables you like, and consume large portions

In regards to veggies, many people feel like they have to keep up with trends. If kale isn’t your thing, don’t sweat it. All vegetables are good for you, so pick what you like.

How to Eat Healthy at Fast Food Restaurants

Many people think that fast food means high calorie meals. But many of the major chains offer some good options for truckers. The following are some of the healthiest options available at typical fast food locations:

  1. Chipotle. This chain offers a variety of healthy options—so long as truck drivers skip the tortilla. Chipotle offers taco salads that allow customers to load up on greens, veggies, chicken or steak.
  2. Panera Bread. This chain that offers a variety of healthy options so long as truck drivers resist temptation like the large mac and cheese which weighs in at 1,100 calories. The turkey avocado BLT is healthy and filling while the Greek salad with chicken is a guilt-free yet tasty choice.
  3. Burger King. The above two fast food options make it simple to stick to healthy choices. Traditional burger chains like Burger King pose more of a challenge. Truck drivers can keep the pounds at bay by opting for a chicken garden salad and keeping their dressing use to a minimum.
  4. Wendy’s. Wendy’s grilled chicken sandwich is a great alternative to a grease-laden burger. Consider swapping out their fries for some chili to increase your protein intake.
  5. Kentucky Fried Chicken. While fried is in its name, KFC does offer some healthier, grilled options. Their grilled chicken sandwich paired with some green beans are a great choice for truck drivers on the road.

Keeping truck drivers healthy is vital for both owner operators and managers of large fleets. Truck drivers need to learn and select the healthiest options available to them while they are out on the road. To learn more creative ways for truckers to stay safe and healthy, contact Interstate Motor Carriers.

Telematics for Owner Operators & Small Fleets

Posted on August 27, 2018

Telematics for Owner Operators & Small Fleets

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Many owner operators and small fleets discount telematics, as large fleets are often construed as the primary buyers. However, this doesn’t mean smaller operations can’t benefit from telematics. The data provides valuable feedback for drivers and fleets, regardless of size. Telematics solutions can track acceleration, driver speed, fuel economy, idling time and braking metrics. Telematics can provide exact location data for all vehicles and trailers, extremely beneficial in the event of a stolen truck or lost trailer. Many small fleets write off telematics because they are often considered large scale applications and come with an equally large price tag. However, there are many cost effective solutions today, and even basic smartphone apps, that drivers and managers can use to obtain Telematics data. While a smartphone app alone would be cumbersome for larger fleets, a manager of a small fleet can track the data for a few trucks from the palm of their hand.

More robust Telematics solutions, from organizations like Lynx Telematics and DriverCheck offer some highly advanced features, though many of these organizations also offer an owner operator version of this technology. Here is sampling of features available from the DriverCheck Telematics solution:

• Driver Behavior-harsh brake/fast acceleration/speeding
• Posted speed limit analysis
• Maintenance alerts and reports
• GIS map integration
• 3rd party vendor software integration
• Driver ID
• Panic Button
• PTO/Accentuator Monitoring
• Unlimited user(s) access from any internet connected device
• Idle and start stop driving reports
• Client customization reports
• Email/text message event based alert notification

Though pricing and features vary widely, costs for Telematics can range from under $14 per month for one truck, to over $40 per month per vehicle.

Owner operators and smaller fleets need to embrace newer technologies to stay competitive. As functionality increases and costs decrease, even the smallest trucking firms can improve operations and profitability by utilizing these cloud based solutions. To learn more about mitigating your trucking risk, contact the experts at Interstate Motor Carriers.